McGILL BIRD OBSERVATORY

SPRING MIGRATION MONITORING PROGRAM

Week 6:  May 2 - May 8, 2005

Welcome to the McGill Bird Observatory weekly report.  Click here for a complete listing of our archives.  Comments or questions are welcome at mbo@migrationresearch.org

PICTURE OF THE WEEK:


This after-second-year Common Yellowthroat is among the very few warblers that
have appeared at MBO to date this spring.  (Photo by Marcel Gahbauer)

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  THIS WEEK SPRING TOTAL YEAR TOTAL SITE TOTAL
# birds (and species) banded 80 (18) 263 (30) 322 (34) 1243 (54)
# birds (and species) repeat 22 (7) 48 (9) 82 (9) 260 (21)
# birds (and species) return 4 (1) 13 (4) 23 (5) 25 (6)
# species observed 56 84 87 147
# net hours 278.5 760.0 818.0 1792.5
# birds banded / net hour 28.7 34.6 39.7 69.3

Note: table does not include nocturnal banding (owls)

Banders-in-charge:  Marcel Gahbauer, Lance Laviolette
Assistants:  Daniel Brown, Jean Demers, Sarah Fraser, Gay Gruner, Marie-Anne Hudson, Marie-Eve Jacques, Meghan Laviolette, Barbara and Don MacDuff, Michael Mayer, Betsy Mcfarlane, Julia Mlynarek, Crissy Ranellucci, Clemence Soulard

Notes:  There have been no major weather fronts over the past week, and as a result migration has been quite slow.  There were 8 new species for the year, but most of these were seen only in small numbers.  A Peregrine Falcon was viciously pursued across the site by a Merlin on Wednesday morning, only our second sighting of the former species.  The slightly warmer weather on the weekend brought in Common Loon, Chimney Swift, Cliff Swallow (these three species all fly-overs), Solitary Sandpiper, Common Yellowthroat, Rose-breasted Grosbeak, and Bobolink.

We had four days of banding this week, but three of them were at least partly compromised by rain and/or wind.  Nonetheless, we banded good numbers of Red-winged Blackbird (21), Cedar Waxwing (15), and American Goldfinch (16), and had our first captures of the year for Yellow-shafted Flicker, Common Yellowthroat, and Common Grackle.  We look forward to a bigger influx of migrants with the next major push of warm air from the south.


Though common at MBO, we had not banded a Yellow-shafted Flicker until this
third-year male landed in net A1 this Wednesday.  (Photo by Marcel Gahbauer)

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