McGILL BIRD OBSERVATORY

SPRING MIGRATION MONITORING PROGRAM

Week 3:  April 11 - 17, 2012

Welcome to the McGill Bird Observatory weekly report.  Click here for a complete listing of our archives.
Comments or questions are welcome at "mbo AT migrationresearch.org".

PICTURE OF THE WEEK:



One of the many female Red-winged Blackbirds settling in at Stoneycroft
Pond for another nesting season.
(Photo by Simon Duval)

 

-

 

THIS WEEK

THIS SPRING

2012 TOTAL

SITE TOTAL

# birds (and species) banded

-

-

75 (10)

35826 (108)

# birds (and species) repeat

-

-

14 (4)

6427 (68)

# birds (and species) return

-

-

26 (6)

987 (37)

# species observed

45

55

63

204

# net hours

-

-

63.7

59162.9

# birds banded / 100 net hours

-

-

117.7

60.6

Note: table does not include nocturnal banding (owls)

Banders-in-charge:  Simon Duval, Gay Gruner
Censusers: 
Sue Bishop, Barbara MacDuff, Betsy McFarlane, Ahmad Shah, Rodger and Elise Titman

Notes:  The third week of spring provided a number of new arrivals to MBO, and boosted the total for the season to 55 species, above average for this time of year.  A record early Common Loon was observed flying overhead, while we also recorded our first Merlin, Yellow-bellied Sapsucker, Swamp Sparrow, White-throated Sparrow, and Purple Finch of the year.  Additionally, firsts for the season were American Black Duck, Northern Pintail, and Killdeer - all species that we observed already in the later part of winter.  The 35 species observed on April 12 was an unusually high count for this time of year; other days this week the total ranged between 19 and 28, highlighting how much the situation can change from one day to the next during migration.


The male Red-winged Blackbirds have been back at MBO for a while already, but with the increase in female numbers, they are all the more intent on staking out their territories and claiming mates.
(Photo by Simon Duval)


This week’s top 10 [last week's rank in brackets]  

# individuals banded

mean # individuals observed daily

-

1.  Canada Goose (101) [1]

-

2.  Red-winged Blackbird (42) [2]

-

3.  Cedar Waxwing (19) [-]

-

4.  American Crow (19) [5]

-

5.  Mallard (19) [10]

-

6.  Song Sparrow (16) [4]

-

7.  American Robin (14) [6]

-

8.  Wood Duck (12) [8]

-

8.  Black-capped Chickadee (12) [7]

-

10.  Ring-billed Gull (11) [3]

Again this week there was just one new species among the ten most frequently observed birds (Cedar Waxwing, replacing Slate-colored Junco).  Canada Goose remained the most abundant species for a third consecutive week, which is typical for this point in spring, and Red-winged Blackbird remained solidly in second place.  Cedar Waxwing is rather erratic in spring, and has only rarely been this abundant so early in the season.  Most of the other species on the list are also expected to be dominant at this time of year.  Next week our spring banding program kicks off for another year, and we look forward to seeing what surprises await us.


A second-year female Tree Swallow checking out one of the MBO nest boxes.
(Photo by Simon Duval)

-

-

 

2002- The Migration Research Foundation Inc.