McGILL BIRD OBSERVATORY

SPRING MIGRATION MONITORING PROGRAM

Week 3:  April 11 - 17, 2013

Welcome to the McGill Bird Observatory weekly report.  Click here for a complete listing of our archives.
Comments or questions are welcome at "mbo AT migrationresearch.org".

PICTURE OF THE WEEK:


Wood Duck
Wood Ducks are active in the ponds again, as usual in April.
(Photo by Simon Duval)

 

-

 

THIS WEEK

THIS SPRING

2013 TOTAL

SITE TOTAL

# birds (and species) banded

-

-

368 (13)

41880 (111)

# birds (and species) repeat

-

-

71 (7)

8052 (70)

# birds (and species) return

-

-

32 (11)

1241 (38)

# species observed

47

59

66

207

# net hours

-

-

55.0

69344.7

# birds banded / 100 net hours

-

-

669.1

60.4

Note: table does not include nocturnal banding (owls)

Banders-in-charge:  Simon Duval, Gay Gruner
Censusers: 
Sue Bishop, Jean Demers, Lisa Keelty, Betsy McFarlane, Clémence Soulard, Elise Titman, Rodger Titman

Notes:  Week 3 represents the final part of "early spring" at MBO, and typically numbers of migrants continue to build, although there are few species that peak around this time of the season.  The first Eastern Phoebe of the season finally was spotted this week, a bit later than usual; on the other hand this week's sightings of Yellow-bellied Sapsucker, Ruby-crowned Kinglet, and Chipping Sparrow were a bit on the early side.  Rounding out this week's dozen newcomers were Green-winged Teal, Yellow-shafted Flicker, Brown Creeper, Winter Wren, Hermit Thrush, Fox Sparrow, Swamp Sparrow, and Pine Siskin.

This week’s top 10 [last week's top 10 in brackets]  

# individuals banded

mean # individuals observed daily

-

1.  Canada Goose (101)  [1]

-

2.  Red-winged Blackbird (46)  [3]

-

3.  Song Sparrow (13)  [-]

-

4.  Black-capped Chickadee (11)  [5]

-

5.  Ring-billed Gull (9)  [4]

-

6.  American Robin (8)  [10]

-

7.  American Crow (8)  [-]

-

8.  Wood Duck (6)  [-]

-

9.  Mallard (6)  [7]

-

10.  Slate-colored Junco (6)  [8]

For the seventh time in 9 years, Canada Goose dominated the third week of spring migration monitoring, this year with a mean daily count more than double that of the runner-up, Red-winged Blackbird.  Song Sparrow cracked the top three for the first time ever this early in spring, but that in part reflected the overall low numbers of most species this week, as it was only marginally more abundant than some of the other local residents, and there was fairly little in the way of new migrants.  Next week will mark the start of the spring banding program, and in addition to the obvious new data that will provide, we expect that observations will also pick up by virtue of more observers being on site for a longer period every morning.

Wolf spider
Wildlife is appearing all over, including inside the cabin - like this wolf spider.
(Photo by Simon Duval)

-

-

 

2002- The Migration Research Foundation Inc.