McGILL BIRD OBSERVATORY

BANDING LOG - SPRING 2004 SEASON

The McGill Bird Observatory is currently operating on a sporadic basis, testing locations on the property in preparation for future full-time operations.  Below are summaries of each of the outings.  Comments or questions are welcome at mbo@migrationresearch.org

Saturday May 1, 2004

Bander in charge:  Marcel Gahbauer Banding assistants:  David Bird, Rodger Titman
Hours:  3.0  (0700-1000) Nets:  3 (WC, CHx2) Net hours:  9.0
Opening weather:  100% cloud, 15C, no wind Closing weather:  100% cloud, 18C, no wind
SPECIES INDIVIDUALS
Observed Census Banded Repeat Return
23 n/a 3 -- 1
Banded Repeat Return
5 -- 1
NOTES:  This morning marked the official launch of the McGill Bird Observatory.  Banding has taken place previously at Stoneycroft on an irregular basis in conjunction with ornithology classes, but this signals the start of what we plan to have evolve into a more thorough and standardized migration monitoring effort.  Our first bird was a Ruby-crowned Kinglet, followed in short order by another, as well as two Red-winged Blackbirds and a couple of Song Sparrows, one of which had been banded here last year.  Another 20 species were observed while in the area, including at least 3 Green Herons, 2 Solitary Sandpipers, and a very active and vocal pair of Pileated Woodpeckers.

Thursday May 6, 2004

Bander in charge:  Marcel Gahbauer Banding assistants:  Shawn Craik
Hours:  4.0  (0630-1030) Nets:  3 (RW, CHx2) Net hours:  9.0
Opening weather:  100% cloud, 13C, no wind, foggy Closing weather:  100% cloud, 16C, no wind
SPECIES INDIVIDUALS
Observed Census Banded Repeat Return
38 n/a 2 -- 1
Banded Repeat Return
4 -- 1
NOTES:  Only a few birds banded (Red-winged Blackbirds and White-throated Sparrows), but not bad considering only three nets were operated.  Nearly 40 species were observed during the morning, bringing the cumulative list for May to over 50.  Overall migration appears to still be slow, with Black-and-white being the only Warbler we detected.  Three deer were seen on the far side of the back pond.

 

 

 

 

2002- The Migration Research Foundation Inc.